Courses Offered

FIRST SEMESTER
SY 2014-2015
Department of Interdisciplinary Studies
School of Humanities
as of 8 May 2014

IS 121.1
MUSIC APPRECIATION I
T/Th, 9:00-10:30 am, RL Music Room
Mr. Allan Pastrana
An introduction to representative examples of serious music and their creators and the relationships between music literature and the social, cultural, and historical milieu in which it flourished. Course methodology includes lectures, assigned readings, exposure to recorded and live performances, group discussions, and practical application.

IS 121.3
THE DEVELOPMENT OF MUSIC IN
WESTERN SOCIETY
MWF, 9:30-10:30 am, RL Music Room
Mr. Jonathan Coo
A survey of music in western history from ancient classical cultures to the early modern period.  Developments will be examined within the historical context, taking into account the multiple influences of social, cultural, political and other relevant forces.

IS 121.6
AN INTRODUCTION TO OPERA
T/Th, 10:30-12:00 am, RL Music Room
Mr. Allan Pastrana
A layman’s first course in the opera as a genre that aims to heighten its appreciation as an art form through a survey of its development in the last 400 years. Includes lecture and film showing.

IS 121.7
RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC
MWF, 11:30-12:30 pm, RL Music Room
Mr. Jonathan Coo
This course orients the music literature track / minor on the written language of music:  Notation,  Scales, Intervals, Transposition, Chords, Cadences , Non-harmonic tones, Melodic Organization, Basic Tonal Harmony in four voices, and  Aural Skills:  Rhythmic, Melodic and Functional Dictation, Interval Identification and Sight Singing

IS 121.15
THE BROADWAY MUSICAL OF THE
20TH CENTURY
MWF, 10:30-11:30 am, RL Music Room
Mr. Jonathan Coo
A course that maps out how three centuries of opera comique gave birth to a popular genre (music theater) developed in England and the USA.

IS 124.6/FA 167.8
ASIAN VERNACULAR
ARCHITECTURE & ARTFORMS
Schedule: TBA
Architect Vincent Pinpin
A course designed for beginners to enhance their understanding and appreciation of Asian vernacular architecture and its related artforms (i.e. painting and sculpture). Example will be drawn from a comparison of vernacular styles of Asian architecture, with emphasis on Filipino style, and its evolution vis-à-vis the arts.

IS 131.7/CHN 61
CHINESE ART AND SOCIETY
T/Th, 3:00-4:30 pm, Bel 310
Prof. Aurora Lim
A survey of the arts and forms of symbolic expressions in China. Emphasis is of the arts with social, historical, technological, philosophical and aesthetic developments. Topics include collective expressions that occasion artistic activity; Chinese aesthetic and artistic standards and their application.

IS 132.3
AN INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM
T/Th, 10:30-12:00 nn, CTC 303
Dr. Renato  Oliveros
A study of basic information on Islam such as the “Five Pillars”, areas of convergence(s) and divergence(s) between Christianity and Islam, the roots of neo-fundamentalism and a Muslim’s response and call for Islamic tolerance (Fetullah Gulen).

IS 134.17
CREATIVE THINKING AND PRACTICE
Schedule: T, 4.30-7:30 pm, TBA
Mr. Elbert Or, Ms. Abigael Favis,
This course highlights the process of innovating interdisciplinary responses to real-life concerns. It challenges students to work collaboratively on identified issues/problems through this process, using analytical, reflective, and creative thinking skills informed by scholarly approaches in their different fields of discipline. It also trains students to pursue innovative ideas that can be designed for greater applicability and sustainability in specific contexts.

IS 142.8/LIT 188
BRITISH LITERATURE
MWF, 1:30-2:30 pm, F116
Dr. Jonathan Chua
This course is a study of the major works of selected authors in British Literature.  At the end of the term, students present a seminar paper on a British author of their choice, upon consultation with the instructor.

IS 143.1
THEOLOGICAL THEMES IN LITERATURE
W, 4:30-7:30 pm
Mr. Darren Gustafson, CTC 304
A study of great theological epics in literature which provide a profound insight into what it means to be a Christian and a human being in the contemporary world.  Readings include Dante’s Inferno, Milton’s Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, and Goethe’s Faust I & II.

IS 143.3/HUM 141
INTRODUCTION TO AESTHETICS
T/Th, 9:00-10:30 am, CTC 304
Instructor: Ms. Dorothea Garing
In introduction to the elements and principles of the aesthetic experience in the visual arts, performing arts and literature, as well as an examination of the varieties of aesthetic norms and standards.

IS/HUM 145
GREAT BOOKS I
(ANCIENT PERIOD)
T/Th, 10:30-12:00 nn, TBA
Mr. Michael Mariano
A course on the Epics (Homer, Virgil), the Scriptures (the Bible, the Koran), the Greek dramas (Sophocles, Aeschylus), the Philosophers (Aristotle, Plato), and other enduring masterpieces of the ancient world. The course discusses and explores the ideas embodied in these texts.

IS /HUM 146
GREAT BOOKS II
(MIDDLE PERIOD)
MWF, 11:30-12:30 am, F116
Dr. Jonathan Chua
This second part of the Great Books series provides insights into the human reality through the reading of books that have endured the test of time.  Selections come from the works of Dante, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Goethe, Augustine and Machiavelli, among others.

IS/ HUM 147
GREAT BOOKS III
(MODERN PERIOD)
T, 4:30-7:30 pm, F116
Dr. Rofel Brion
The last of the Great Books series. The course explores the traditional concerns of modern man (alienation, fragmentation) and recent debates on race, gender, class, and the canon of “great books”: selections from 20th century world literatures.

IS 162.5
FILM AND THE OTHER ARTS
Th, 4:30-7:30 pm, Faura AVR
Dr. Nicanor Tiongson
This course investigates the multidimensional relations between film and the other arts (aside from literature), namely, architecture and the visual arts, the performing arts and the media arts.

IS 163.1
NON-VIOLENCE
T/Th, 3:00-4:30 pm, F116
Dr. Nikki Carsi Cruz
An interdisciplinary and experiential approach to the study of nonviolence. The course considers the actual violence in our present situation, the theoretical frameworks for nonviolence (theological, philosophical), and the historical experiences with non-violence (India, South Africa, United States).

IS 163.3
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES:  CULTURAL STUDIES OF TECHNOLOGY
(HYPERMEDIA, THE WORLD WIDE WEB, AND THE CONTEMPORARY CRITICAL THEORY AND TECHNOLOGY)
W, 4:30-7:30 pm, F116
Mr. George Peter Lorenzana
This is an introductory course on the cultural studies of technology from a global perspective. It can be used as an elective by social science, humanities, or interdisciplinary studies major. In this one semester course, we shall explore the rhyzomatics of technology in history of the present and highlight the multi-linear and non-narrative form of the World Wide Web and other hypermedia technologies. Issues such as the changing parameters of reading and literacy, the impact of an emerging network culture on the contemporary postcolonial, and many more besides are pursued through extensive readings and the experiencing of various hypermedia tools. Prospective students will explore hypertext non/fiction and other documents drawn from the World Wide Web.

IS 163.4
DYNAMICS OF GRIEF AND LOSS IN A FAMILY CONTEXT                
PRE-REQ: PSY 101
S, 9:00-12:00 am, F116
Ms. Cathy Guballa
This course will undertake an examination of the various grief processes that take place within families as they experience various kinds of loss. Through readings and lectures we explore a variety of factors which facilitates and/or impede the ability to function after loss. An international component, drawing on materials primarily Asian will broaden the understanding of loss and grief beyond the dominant cultural views of North America. The course will also have a workshop component where students are made to look inside themselves and eventually understand their own reactions to personal and private losses.

ALL subjects can be taken as
FREE ELECTIVES.