Courses Offered

Course Offered
SY 2014-2015
Department of Interdisciplinary Studies
School of Humanities
as of 18 March 2014

SUMMER 2014

IS 133.4

GENDER, ART AND SOCIETY

An introductory course to gender as it is portrayed in art and society, aiming to lay bare gender issues in the art world in particular in the context of larger gender constructions in society.

IS 161.8

YOUTH LEADERSHIP FOR ENGAGED CITIZENSHIP

A course that provides students an opportunity to discover their leadership capacity through an understanding of the core leadership pillars discussed in Chris Lowney’s Heroic Leadership. The key success elements –  Self-Awareness, Ingenuity, Love and Heroism – are appropriated to the personal experiences of the students.

FIRST SEMESTER

IS 121.1
MUSIC APPRECIATION I
The course is an introduction to representative examples of serious music and their creators and the significant relationships between the body of music literature and the social, cultural and historical milieu in which it flourished. The methods employed shall include lectures, assigned readings, exposure to recorded and live performances, group discussions and an application of musical rudiments such as sight treading and notation.

IS 121.3
THE DEVELOPMENT OF MUSIC IN WESTERN SOCIETY
A general survey of music in western history from ancient classical cultures to the early modern period.  Developments will be examined within the historical context, taking into account the multiple influences of social, cultural, political and other relevant forces.

IS 121.6
AN INTRODUCTION TO OPERA
A layman’s first course in the opera as a genre that aims to heighten its appreciation as an art form through a survey of its development in the last 400 years. Includes lecture and film showing.

IS 121.7
RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC
This course orients the music literature track / minor on the written language of music:  Notation,  Scales, Intervals, Transposition, Chords, Cadences , Non-harmonic tones, Melodic Organization, Basic Tonal Harmony in four voices, and  Aural Skills:  Rhythmic, Melodic and Functional Dictation, Interval Identification and Sight Singing

IS 121.15
THE BROADWAY MUSICAL OF THE
20TH CENTURY
A course that maps out how three centuries of opera comique gave birth to a popular genre (music theater) developed in England and the USA.

IS 122.5/FA 139.1
PRODUCTION DESIGN
An introduction to the elements of stage design—set, costumes, lights—as well as their execution in the context of a particular production or dramatic text.

IS 124.6/FA 167.8
ASIAN VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE & ARTFORMS
A course designed for beginners to enhance their understanding and appreciation of Asian vernacular architecture and its related artforms (i.e. painting and sculpture). Example will be drawn from a comparison of vernacular styles of Asian architecture, with emphasis on Filipino style, and its evolution vis-à-vis the arts.

IS 131.7/CHN 61
CHINESE ART AND SOCIETY
A survey of the arts and forms of symbolic expressions in China. Emphasis is of the arts with social, historical, technological, philosophical and aesthetic developments.  Topics include collective expressions that occasion artistic activity; Chinese aesthetic and artistic standards and their application.

IS 132.3
AN INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM
This is an introductory course to Islam with emphasis given to its historicity and its impact on Western civilization. It covers the formative period (622-661 C.E.) from the call of Muhammad to the formation of the early Muslim community in Medina where the first khilafah (Caliphate/Islamic State) was established.

IS 143.1
THEOLOGICAL THEMES IN LITERATURE
A study of great theological epics in literature which provide a profound insight into what it means to be a Christian and a human being in the contemporary world.  Readings include Dante’s Inferno, Milton’s Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, and Goethe’s Faust I & II.

IS 143.3/HUM 141
INTRODUCTION TO AESTHETICS
In introduction to the elements and principles of the aesthetic experience in the visual arts, performing arts and literature, as well as an examination of the varieties of aesthetic norms and standards. The course seeks to introduce the students to basic theories of Western aesthetics.  It also aims to show how these theories have shaped the production of cultural artifacts at different historical moments.  

IS/HUM 145
GREAT BOOKS I
(ANCIENT PERIOD)
This course introduces the students to the masterpieces of classical antiquity in the hope of civilizing their mind and broadening their vision. The Epcs (Homer, Virgil), the Scriptures (the Bible, the Koran), the Greek dramas (Sophocles, Aeschylus), the Philosophers (Aristotle, Plato), and other enduring masterpieces of the ancient world will be read and discussed.  The Course will explore the ideas embodied in these texts and the categories by which they have been canonized.

IS /HUM 146
GREAT BOOKS II  (MIDDLE PERIOD)
This second part of the Great Books series provides insights into the human reality through the reading of books that have endured the test of time.  Selections come from the works of Dante, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Goethe, Augustine and Machiavelli, among others. This course acquaints the students with the masterpieces of literature from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the nineteenth century.

IS/ HUM 147
GREAT BOOKS III
(MODERN PERIOD)
This last of the Great Book series explores the traditional (“metaphysical”) concerns of “modern man” (e.g. alienation, fragmentation, secularization) and the more recent debates on race, gender, class, and the very existence of the canon of “great books”.  Selections from 20th century world literatures will read and discussed including Kafka, Camus, Faulkner, etc..The course also links specific texts to the Philippine literary situation. In this course students read and discuss the classics of the modern period.  

IS 162.5
FILM AND THE OTHER ARTS
This course investigates the multidimensional
relations between film and the other arts (aside from literature), namely, architecture and the visual arts, the performing arts and the media arts.

IS 163.1
NON-VIOLENCE
An interdisciplinary and experiential approach to the study of nonviolence. The course considers the actual violence in our present situation, the theoretical frameworks for nonviolence (theological, philosophical), and the historical experiences with non-violence (India, South Africa, United States).

163.3
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES:
CULTURAL STUDIES OF TECHNOLOGY
(HYPERMEDIA, THE WORLD WIDE WEB, AND THE CONTEMPORARY CRITICAL THEORY AND TECHNOLOGY)
This is an introductory course on the cultural studies of technology from a global perspective. It can be used as an elective by social science, humanities, or interdisciplinary studies major. In this one semester course, we shall explore the rhyzomatics of technology in history of the present and highlight the multi-linear and non-narrative form of the World Wide Web and other hypermedia technologies. Issues such as the changing parameters of reading and literacy, the impact of an emerging network culture on the contemporary postcolonial, and many more besides are pursued through extensive readings and the experiencing of various hypermedia tools. Prospective students will explore hypertext non/fiction and other documents drawn from the World Wide Web.

IS 163.4
DYNAMICS OF GRIEF AND LOSS IN A FAMILY CONTEXT
PRE-REQUISITE: PSY 101
The course examines the grief processes that take within families as they experience loss.  This course will explore a variety of factors that facilitate and/or impede the ability to function after loss.  An international component, drawing primarily on Asian and African materials, will broaden the understanding of loss and grief beyond the dominant cultural views of North America.  

All subjects
can
be taken as
FREE ELECTIVES.